The Case for Appropriation: Rob Storr


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Rob Storr provides a clear introduction and overview of the historical and contemporary issues around artists and appropriation specifically 'originality', appropriation and Modernism (February 2012 SVA panel). These are similar tensions to what the open educational movement are experiencing in terms of use are reuse in open educational practice and teaching practice.

Please see ( http://process.arts.ac.uk/content/egoer-and-ip-oer-case-study-example-open-arts-practice ) where I talk about EGOER (not worrying about being/practicing online, just go for it) & I give a brief example of an IP, IPR case study/experience.

Also see The Case for Appropriation: full video here- The Case for Appropriation, a panel moderated by Joy Garnett at the School of Visual Arts 

Rob Storr is an artist, critic, curator and in 2006 was appointed Professor of Painting and Dean of the School of Art at Yale University. He was curator in the Department of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, from 1990 to 2002. Mr. Storr has taught at the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU, at CUNY, the Bard Center for Curatorial Studies, Rhode Island School of Design, Tyler School of Art, New York Studio School, and at Harvard. He has written numerous catalogs, articles, and books, and is the recipient of many honors and awards, too many to name here. He is currently Consulting Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and in 2007 was chosen commissioner of the 2007 Venice Biennale, the first American invited to assume that position.

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Anonymous's picture

That was a really nice interview from Rob Storr. Rob Storr provides a clear introduction and overview of the historical and contemporary issues around artists and appropriation specifically 'originality', appropriation and Modernism. He is currently consulting curator at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

cfollows's picture

Duplication, appropriation and innovation: exploring comic book art A major Lichtenstein retrospective is running currently at Tate, but LCF’s Steven Cook reveals that many viewers will be unaware that “many of his images were directly “appropriated” from comic artists like Irv Novick, Russ Heath, Jack Kirby, John Romita and Joe Kubert, who received no fee or credit.” Forthcoming show Image Duplicator, which has been featured in Creative Review and Design Boom, will  exhibit artists who have created new interpretations of the comics Lichtenstein used as source material to  explore the issues of appropriation, credit and originality in comic book art. Read more http://www.orbitalcomics.com about this exhibition and here at - http://newsevents.arts.ac.uk/36206/duplication-appropriation-and-innovation-exploring-comic-book-art

Also see related video above I found early last year and more about appropriation here - http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/tags/copyright-issues 

cfollows's picture

Damien Hirst faces eight new claims of plagiarism - (watch the above video and rest of debate even, this really puts this article into perspective, bad art journalism ) - http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2010/sep/02/damien-hirst-plagiarism-claims

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This moving image, The Case for Appropriation: Rob Storr , by Joy Garnett, Rob Storr, SVA is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.
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